Health Services
Upcoming Events

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James L. Tomarken,
MD, MPH, MBA, MSW
Commissioner

Address

Suffolk County Department of Health Services
3500 Sunrise Highway, Suite 124
P.O. Box 9006
Great River, New York 11739-9006
Directions


Telephone (631) 854 - 0000
Fax (631) 854 - 0108

Emergencies after 5:00 PM
& Weekends
(631) 852 - 4820


Public Health Hotline
(631) 787-2200

Email
scdhsweb@suffolkcountyny.gov

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Published: 12/12/2014

Suffolk County Commissioner of Health Services James Tomarken reported today the first and only human case of West Nile virus in Suffolk County in 2014.  The individual, a male over 55 years of age who resides in the Town of Islip, was hospitalized in late August upon experiencing symptoms consistent with West Nile virus.  The patient has since recovered and returned home. 


Published: 12/9/2014

Flu is a serious contagious disease that can lead to hospitalization and even death. 

Do you know? Flu viruses spread from person to person through droplets released when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. Those infected with flu may be able to infect others from one day before until one week after developing symptoms. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that you fight the flu by taking the following actions:


Published: 12/4/2014
Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone and Health Commissioner James Tomarken, MD, MPH, are urging all residents who have not yet received this season’s flu immunization to get one as soon as possible. Additionally, they ask those residents who are at high risk for complications from flu to seek medical care promptly if they do experience flu-like symptoms

Published: 12/3/2014

The Suffolk County Department of Health Services will hold a meeting of:

The Board of Health 
Wednesday, Dec 17, 2014
9:30 a.m.











Published: 11/28/2014

On December 1, Suffolk County joins people throughout the world in observance of World AIDS Day to honor those living with HIV; the families, friends, caregivers, and communities who support them; and those who have lost their lives to AIDS. Three decades after the first cases of AIDs were reported, it is important for communities to recognize that HIV remains a major health problem in the U.S. and that prevention is key to ending the AIDs epidemic

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